anonymous feels we are somehow misleading our viewers

Pleased with McGuffey's Readers World service

Customer Likes McGuffey's Readers World:

Her children taught with McGuffey's readers in Baptist school:

Excerpts from a long email from a McGuffey Readers admirer:

Your website is absolutely charming:

I've read a lot

From a teacher in Alaska:

My mother

I Dearly Love

Correspondence with Jean-Marie Moes

sales pitch

Thanks

Dear McGuffey's Readers World:

Dear Mr. Watt: (Publisher)

Hello,

Grandfather

 

Hello,

Your citation of Noah Webster's comments on the importance of the Christian religion in education is not from the Preface to the 1828 edition of his dictionary, but from a letter to David McClure, 1836:
http://40lions.blogspot.com/2010/01/noah-webster-on-importance-of-christian.html
You are misinforming all who view that page, and as it is high in the search results at Google, that must be a significant number of people. Please fulfill your duty to God and to your readers.
Regards, A.

This person (Who chose to be anonymous) feels we are somehow misleading our viewers. The sources of information we have used on our McGuffey Readers Website were provided to us by others whom we feel are reliable. But, in case we are wrong you can check this source out for yourself.
Thanks to Anonymous for the tip. Top of Page

Pleased with McGuffey's Readers World service

Thanks so much. You provide a wonderful service. God Bless.

--Mark Hambleton, Randalstown, Maryland, April 2009 Top of Page

Customer Likes McGuffey's Readers World:

I want two "1828 Noah Webster" hard cover dictionaries, and one CD version of the 1828 Noah Webster dictionary also. Thanks so much for your excellent service and products-it is truly invaluable!!!!!!!!!

--Mark Hambleton, Randallstown MD, March 2009 Top of Page

Her children taught with McGuffey's readers in Baptist school:

My children attended a Baptist school which taught from the McGuffy readers. I had never seen anything like them before. I was impressed; I was touched. I cannot get them out of my mind and am compelled to order my own set of these treasures.

--Evelyn Frankhauser, Maryland, September 2008 Top of Page

Excerpts from a long email from a McGuffey Readers admirer:

To think that in 1874[9] --10-12 year olds would be exposed to the "6th" [McGuffey Reader, 1879 version] is quite frankly incomprehensible. This tells one more about the abysmal state of education [now] than anyone can conceive. How many current college graduates* are up to the "6th?"
Somewhere along the way I read/heard that Henry Ford was an enormous admirer of McGuffey and that his home is amongst the 83 historic structures at Ford's Greenfield Village.

--Jim Mulligan, Barre, VT, July 2008, * Emphasis added. Top of Page

Your website is absolutely charming:

We would like to order 5 sets of the McGuffey Readers.
Please let us know if you folks can do this. Your website is absolutely charming, and I did not know about that math series with workbooks.

--Latisia Brieno - Secretary for D. Stan Monteith of Radio Liberty, California, May 2008 Top of Page

I've read a lot

about the [McGuffey] Readers in American History and wondered if they were still available for my nieces. Thank you for your wonderful service in distributing them.

--Sarah Gervase, Fairfax, Virginia - December 2007 Top of Page

From a teacher in Alaska:

Over the past thirty years, I've used McGuffey Readers to teach reading to regular education students as well as gifted and special needs students. I have had 3 sets of the readers, but am down to 1 complete set. While trying to fill in the other sets, I have discovered the value of these books all over again and sought out more materials from this era and faith basis. I am thrilled to see that an entire curriculum is available!
Thank you!

Barbara Heinrichs, Kodiak November 2007 Top of Page

My mother

is a retired school teacher and she remembered the name of these books [McGuffey's Readers] that we learned on as children. I want to give someone special a great start in reading.

Juliette K., Elizabeth Lake CA., October 2007 Top of Page

I Dearly Love

McGuffey's Readers, introduced my children and grandchildren to them. I firmly believe that we could once again become the nation we were formed to be if we could go back to the timeless principles espoused in these grand textbooks!

Patricia N. of DeLand, FL - August 2007 Top of Page

Dear Peter & June,

When I discovered your website, where you declare that you "desire to provide the best, time-tested educational materials available", I knew I had found the people I should be talking to regarding my current project. Your offer does indeed include several notable 19th century schoolbooks, amongst which Ray's Arithmetic. These seem to have been part for quite a while of a recommended set of schoolbooks, alongside the McGuffey's Readers and several other "old fashioned" materials. Although your offer doesn't include any of Charles Davies' books, I thought nevertheless - since you've been publishing such materials for over 20 years now - that you might be more knowledgeable than myself about this fellow, and might even provide me some insightful advice.

Why, would you ask? Well, just follow me, while I lead through my most recent undertaking.

My story goes like this. A couple of months ago, I was searching Google Books for antique mathematics books, when I literally stumbled upon Charles Davies's works ( http://tinyurl.com/3bk3rk ). I've lost count of how many current and ancient mathematics books I've read over the last 20 years. Some of them were really good at making you feel brighter once you had finished reading them, but only a few were great at truly popularizing elementary mathematical techniques. I consider I was lucky to learn them at school, but contrary to Andrew Perry's recent statement (*), I've never believed they've been made obsolete by today's technology. All I have to do is look around me to know thousands of people could immensely benefit from the knowledge offered by these cultural treasures.

Now, I must confess I had never heard about Charles Davies before. It was with much delight I discovered he had already described in 1859 how I still do feel today towards mathematics instruction in his preamble to "Arithmetic or, An Analysis of the Science of Numbers. With Especial Reference to Mental Training and Development": "It is the object of this book to train and develop the mind by means of the science of numbers. Numbers are the instruments here employed to strengthen the memory, to cultivate the faculty of abstraction and to give force and vigor to the reasoning powers." This is the way these inherited volumes invite us indeed to "a Wondrous World of Exploration and Knowledge - of Curiosity and Intuition - of Development of Individual Skills", says Anthony Aliberty, my first provider of original Charles Davies books on eBay.

It was then obvious to me I had to do something to give the world a chance to discover Charles Davies's writings anew. According to my readings so far, it would seem what mattered most to Charles Davies was to always shed new light on a few basic tenets, upon which he expanded his whole work, writing his books over and over again. He had a deep understanding of education matters, which most certainly helped him to come up with a few striking concepts, which could suit toddlers and engineers alike. True to his "Art and Business of Teaching Geometry" (Amy Ackerberg-Hastings) (**), I've thus decided to create my own company, "Insanely Great Maths Publishing", and my aim as such is to be the marketer of Charles Davies's Reprints.

I haven't decided yet which one of Charles Davies book will be the first to hit the market next summer, but any piece of information you might provide on ancient materials publishing or on this gentleman and his works would be highly appreciated.

Regards,
Jean-Marie Moes (jmm40@mac.com)
---
(*)"Nineteenth century algebra textbooks are surprising both in their similarities to today's textbooks and in their fascinating differences. Some excerpts of interest to today's reader will be presented, with special attention paid to clever mathematical techniques made obsolete by today's technology. The evolution of algebra pedagogy over that period (as reflected in textbooks) will be analyzed. Authors to be considered include John Bonnycastle, Charles Davies, E.E. Milne, Thomas Simpson, Samuel Webber and G.A. Wentworth." (Andrew Perry, Springfield College - Evolution of Nineteenth Century American Elementary Algebra Textbooks - Abstracts 2006, CSHPM Annual Meeting, York University, May 28-30)

(**) "Chapter Five - The Two Circles Will Touch Each Other Internally: Charles Davies at the Art and Business of Teaching Geometry" (http://tinyurl.com/yok2jz)

-------------------------

On May 12th, 2007 at 06:52 pm, peter watt wrote:

Dear Jean-Marie Moes:

Thank you for your very informative email. We did not know of Charles Davies until you introduced us to him. We do not actually publish any of the books you see offered on the McGuffey's Readers World website. * We purchase them from other publishers and resell them. We do so because we believe these "old- timey" programs are the best available.

In the interest of furthering the information we make available to our McGuffeys' Readers World viewers (Currently running at a rate of about 11,000 per year) we would like to ask permission to add your email to our "Comments From Viewers" section. Please advise if you would allow us to do so. Who knows, someone might respond to you with more information about Mr. Davies or other interesting teaching materials. We would be sure to forward any such information to you.

Peter Watt for McGuffey's Readers World

* We do, however, publish books by Samuel Blumenfeld on teaching phonics reading. Please see our other website: www.alpha-phonics.com

-------------------------

Jean-Marie Moes Responds:

Dear Peter Watt,

Many thanks for your reply. Your websites are very informative too, they help me shape my understanding of 19th century education, and I would be really honored to receive feedback from your viewers. I can't however find the link to the "Comments From Viewers" section: could you please let me know how I can reach it from your homepage?

May I add another request? You'll find a preliminary draft of my sales pitch underneath this message. Since you grant your viewers the right to "copy / print anything on this site", would you allow me to include part of your "Ray's Arithmetic Series" web page (http://www.mcguffeyreaders.com/ arithmetic.htm) in an upcoming version of my marketing material? Your comments on the current version will be welcome too.

Regards,
Jean-Marie

sales pitch

The deluge of facts and figures we're faced with everyday is just mind boggling. Whether it is to help their children do their homework, understand the news, or read their bank statement, people are often required to "give more force and vigor to their reasoning powers" without necessarily knowing how they can achieve this goal. When requested as such to "cultivate their faculty of abstraction", they wish they could remember where their schoolbooks have gone.

Back in 1859, Charles Davies offered to solve these problems with a unique method. He had indeed discovered that the major skill people needed to develop, was a true understanding of the meaning of the numbers they were faced with in their everyday life. Deeply rooted in the lessons he had learned as a mathematics professor, he went on writing a series of books that would ultimately allow children and grownups alike to "train and develop their mind" and "strengthen their memory."

When I discovered Charles Davies' method, I knew I had to market it if I was serious about helping people solve their number literacy (mind development / memory strengthening) issues. Charles Davies' method is a no-nonsense, step-by-step approach of numbers, that will gradually allow you to develop the right arithmetic mindset. It will teach you strategies and techniques that will enable you to master and rightfully apply arithmetics to the needs and wants of your everyday life.

Shed a new light on the facts and figures you cross and meet everyday. What message do they convey? Why should we focus on units instead of numbers? How could this newfound point of view possibly transform your life, make you gain a deeper understanding of the world that surrounds you, by simply making you join the ranks of the truly mathematics literate people?

Embark with me on the discovery of "Arithmetic or, An Analysis of the Science of Numbers - With Especial Reference to Mental Training and Development"! It is a Charles Davies classic, if not his most important work, where he declares that "it is the object of this (method) to train and develop the mind by means of the science of numbers. Numbers are the instruments here employed to strengthen the memory, to cultivate the faculty of abstraction and to give force and vigor to the reasoning powers."

Thanks

It is so great to find out that we can train our children and grandchildren the early Chrisitan values and Godly principles that are GONE from Public Education today. Sadly, bringing these principles back to US education seems to be impossible...other than prayer. I have no doubt that God can return our country to it's old Bible-based values if only we give Him the power to re-enter our educational systems.
Thank you and God Bless your efforts,
Sharon Verner - October 2006
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Dear McGuffey's Readers World:

I very much wanted to let you know how much I appreciate what you offer on your internet site. Especially I want to thank you for providing so many useful articles about the books and their authors. I believe on every article you also offer leads to further sites and information I can find if I want to investigate further on my own.
Thanks again and keep up the great work.

(Mrs.) Sherre P. Scribner,
Carmichael, California - October 2006 -
Top of Page

Dear Mr. Watt: (Publisher)

Thank you for selling such fine products! Last year, while employed as a second grade teacher, I used the Alpha-Phonics and the McGuffey's Readers to help a struggling young student.

The student began the year with a reading level that was well below the first grade. He did not know enough words or phonics skills to develop any kind of reading fluency. After testing him I knew that he would need daily, remedial instruction with the use of pedagogically-sound materials.

During the school year the student worked his way through the Alpha-Phonics and three of the McGuffey's Readers (beginning with the Eclectic Primer and finishing with the Second Eclectic Reader). Over the nine-month period this child learned to read with fluency and enjoyment! By the last month of the school year, he was reading at a beginning 3rd grade level.

This child now feels comfortable with both prose and poetry, and he eagerly visits the library to check out books on a variety of subjects. With further practice I know he is destined to become a >mature, competent reader. He has "unlocked the door" to a lifetime of learning and discovery!

Mr. Michael Baba - Elementary School Teacher & Reading Specialist - July 2006 -
Top of Page

Hello,

my 9 year-old daughter has read Little House on the Prairie series and has found out that they used the McGuffey Readers. She is interested in reading the readers they used for history. Would you know what series was used in that era. I have done some research online but need help with this.

Any help would be much appreciated.
Thanks so much,
Carmen - (homeschooling mom to Zachary and Leah) - May 2006

Publisher responds:
McGuffey's Readers World did not have the answer for Carmen. Do you?
Top of Page

My Grandfather

has his original McGuffey's Readers and we used to read together from it. He was born in 1906 and lived in Dunvegen Ontario, Canada. I memorized a poem about a wicked froggy. Can you tell me what edition this poem appeared in and who wrote it? It began as follows (as I remember it):
"Once upon a time on the border of a brook, sat a wicked little froggy
who had never read a story or a funny little rhyme and had a sad tragic ending, once upon a time.
The little froggy sad to say was very fond of flies and thought on this unlucky day that he had found a prize??
It goes on until the frog ends up ignoring his danger and being eaten by a duck.

Do you have any information about this poem or do you know how I could find it?

Thanks so much for any help you can give me!
Amy Collins - May 2006

Publisher responds:
McGuffey's Readers World suggested she look on our website for the tables of contents we reproduce for each book in the two McGuffey's sets we offer (Hard cover 1936 & soft Cover 1879) Do you know the answer to Amy's question?
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